Snowboarding, Stephen Hawking & My First Book.

It’s time to start writing my first book.

I have no idea what it’s going to be about, but it’s time to write it nonetheless.

It’s Olympic season here on Earth, and my hometown was buried under a snowstorm this past weekend. The two things conspired to have me watching stories about some incredible athletes and their journeys. Of all things, a story about a snowboarder caught my attention. Canada’s Mark McMorris, an Olympic snowboarder, someone I hadn’t heard of before this weekend, was the subject of a short docu spot that I found riveting. Let me share his story with you.

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This young man, barely into his early twenties, was competing in Korea on February 10, less than a year after having been involved in a snowboarding accident that could easily have been fatal. Upon waking up from a coma in hospital, one of the first things he asked was if he was still ok to go to the Olympics that were happening less than a year later. It was March 25, 2017, and his body had suffered huge trauma, fractured ribs, a punctured let lung, a ruptured spleen, not to mention a broken arm and a pelvic fracture.

Now, what I found the most remarkable was his statement that “I am going to be in pain anyway, why not be in pain from rehabbing and training for the Olympics.” (I paraphrased this, so perhaps the quotes aren’t entirely accurate, but it’s the sentiment that’s important, not the exact words.)

So many of his teammates, and family members probably looked at him and thought “Wow! That’s so inspiring! To not give up, even after such an incredible injury!”, but I suspect that his response would be something like,”Well, what else was I going to do? Lay down and die? No. I have a job to do, and it’s time to get back to it.”

I am inspired by people who are so matter of fact about the work that they have to do. They know their hearts, and they follow their path without hesitation or bravado. It is just what they have to do.

It is a waste of time to

Stephen Hawking is one of these types of people. When he was diagnosed with ALS in his early twenties, he was already a student at Cambridge University, and working on his Theory of Everything. His initial prognosis was 2 years. His response? I had better get to work. Yet another person who faced terrible odds, a disease that was going to take his body from him, and yet he knew his purpose, and upon hearing his time was short, rather than shrivel into hopelessness, he got to work.

Many of us do not have this certainty of purpose, and that is not a failing on our parts, but it does make facing grim odds more challenging, without a purpose to hold us fast to the fragile thread of life we often shrivel in hopelessness and cease to be before life even leaves our bodies.

Why am I telling you this?

Because it’s time to start writing my first book.

I don’t know what the shape of the book will be, nor what stories it will contain, or the lessons that will be between it’s covers, both for my readers and for myself. What I do know, is it’s time for me to start writing it.

This is the knowing that Mark had, that Stephen had, the knowing that I have work to do, and it’s time to get to it.

It’s a whisper, and I have to be still inside to hear it, but it’s there.

And I am going to get started.

Follow me on Instagram and I will be sharing my journey, in my story and on my feed.

Let the adventure begin 🙂

xo Steph

Oh! And if you want to walk the journey alongside me, please come and join the Write Now Facebook Writing Community and we can write our books together.

**To learn more about Mark McMorris, watch his story here.

**To learn more about Stephen Hawking and his life, watch “The Theory of Everything” currently available on Netflix. Click here to watch the trailer.

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